What’s Your Brand and Why Does it Matter?

Joe Cool

Are you Joe Cool?

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Or perhaps you’re the queen of the call center?

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Or just the girl on the go… regardless of snow?

In today’s competitive market, it’s more important than ever to have a personal brand to separate yourself from the pack. But for executives who have experienced a great deal of success, what should go into your brand?

When I have an initial conversation with executives, they communicate a litany of skills and accomplishments, often far ranging and far reaching. Very few are able to succinctly sum up what truly differentiates them and makes them unique. In other words, very few have thought about or developed their personal brand. That’s because to a person, they’ve been wrapped up and committed to developing their company’s brand, focusing on driving performance and profitability.

Having a personal brand not only helps you as an individual, it also reflects well on your company. One of the best examples of this is Steve Jobs, a genuine visionary whose personal brand helped shape Apple as a company that drives innovation.

But when you’re ready to leave your company, what does the marketplace know about you? Have you been diligent and deliberate about developing your brand, calling out what makes you a unique and desirable leader? In today’s digital age, when a quick search and a couple of clicks can reveal so much, are you showing up?

Most executives are not and that’s why it’s crucial to avoid being a digital dinosaur, step into the 21st century and embrace today’s technologies to develop a consistent, cross platform personal brand. It should include a web portfolio, a polished LinkedIn Profile and, if you have time, a Twitter account and perhaps a blog to show off your skills as a subject matter expert. In this way you take control of the content and message and create a unique, memorable personal brand.

Developing your personal brand is what it takes if, instead of running with the pack you want to lead it.

~Linda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Billionaire Bandying: Broadcasting Brand

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Love him or hate him (there seems to be no in between), Donald Trump’s rise to the Presidency can be attributed in large part to his use of social media. In sending out tweets, the President-Elect was able to control his message, going around traditional media, avoiding biases and inaccuracies to communicate directly with the people. In this way, he was able to market himself and his personal brand. When questioned about his twitter use on 60 Minutes, Trump said, “I find it tremendous. It’s a modern form of communication. There should be nothing you should be ashamed of. It’s — it’s where it’s at.”

They don’t agree on much, but billionaire businessman, Dallas Maverick’s Owner and “Shark Tank” star, Mark Cuban also thinks it’s where it’s at. He too, is a prolific tweeter. During an interview with Business Insider, Cuban remarked that it’s the ease in which he can get his message out that’s so appealing about Twitter.

So you have two billionaires who have cultivated mega personal brands squaring off on social media. What does that mean to you? As a modern day executive looking to advance in your career, it’s a lesson in self-promotion and marketing. To establish yourself as a subject matter expert, savvy in today’s communication and marketing techniques, you need to be putting yourself out there, controlling your message and broadcasting your brand.

~Linda

Does BMI Trump IQ and ROI in an Executive Job Search? It Can.

ExerciseI recently read a Wall Street Journal Blog, Want to Be CEO? What’s Your BMI? The blog cites new research suggesting “that a few extra pounds or a slightly larger waistline affects an executive’s perceived leadership ability as well as stamina on the job.”  Which begs the question, if your body-mass-index is having an impact on your perceived ability when you already hold the position, what kind of impact is it having when you’re looking to make a move?

According to Ana Dutra, the CEO of Korn/Ferry Leadership and Talent Consulting, there is a new fitness imperative for executives. It used to be expected that they spend every waking hour on business, but now being fit and exercising is factoring into the executive equation.

Right or wrong, your appearance does play a significant role in the job search process. Because it takes only a matter of seconds to make a first impression, you’re expected to “suit up” and look your best for job interviews. What does that mean if you’re overweight? According to Amanda Sanders, a New York-based image consultant, excess weight can convey weakness or a “lack of control.”

This means an executive who is looking for a new challenge needs not only to demonstrate their ability to achieve significant ROI and to be thought leaders with superior IQs, they also have to go the extra mile (so to speak) to achieve a low BMI.

Now if you’re approaching a job search, in addition to shaping up your resume and executive biography, you might also consider approaching a gym. While content is king in your marketing materials, perception is reality when meeting someone in person.

~Linda